Loading..
  • English
    • English (English)
    • Arabic (العربية)
    • French (Français)
    • German (Deutsche)
    • Italian (Italiano)
    • Japanese (日本語)
    • Korean (한국어)
    • Portuguese (Português)
    • Russian (Pусский)
    • Simplified Chinese (简体中文)
    • Traditional Chinese (繁體中文)
    • Spanish (Español)
    • Türkçe (Türkçe)
Student Information

ENGLISH LANGUAGE TIPS

English Grammar Rules about Conditionals

Conditional sentences describe an action that is dependent on something else occurring. 

1st Conditional/ Conditional 1/ Conditional I

The First Conditional is used to describe factual present situations or potential future situations.

  • If I see you tomorrow, I will buy you dinner.
  • If you buy me dinner, I might cook for you sometime.
  • I will buy you dinner if I see you tomorrow.
  • I might cook for you, if you buy me dinner.
  • Unless you eat your dinner, I won’t buy you dessert.
  • If you don’t eat your dinner, I won’t buy you dessert.

2nd Conditional/ Conditional 2/ Conditional II

The Second Conditional describes situations that are not real.  They are frequently used to communicate a wish. 

  • If I had more money, I would order the filet mignon.
  • I would order the filet mignon, if I had more money.
  • If I were you, I wouldn’t eat that filet mignon in front of me.
  • I wouldn’t eat that filet mignon in front of me, if I were you.
  • If I had more money, I would eat more filet mignon.
  • I would eat more filet mignon, if I had more money.

3rd Conditional/ Conditional 3/ Conditional III

The Third Conditional describes situations in the past that did not occur.  This conditional frequently describes regret with situations that could have, would have, or should have occurred.

  • If I had worked more, I could have ordered more filet mignon.
  • If I had worked more, I would have ordered more filet mignon.
  • If I had health concerns, I should have ordered less filet mignon.
  • I could have ordered more filet mignon, if I had worked more.
  • I would have ordered more filet mignon, if I had worked more.
  • I should have ordered less filet mignon, if I had health concerns.
  • If I hadn’t taken the day off you would have eaten alone.
  • You would have eaten alone if I hadn’t taken the day off.

Conditional 0/ Zero Conditional

The Conditional Zero is used to express truths and scientifically based facts.  More succinctly, it conveys an absolute certainty.

  • If you cook filet mignon at 100 degrees Celsius, it browns.
  • Filet mignon browns, if you cook it at 100 degrees.
  • If you drop that filet mignon on the floor, I will be disappointed.
  • I will be disappointed, if you drop that filet mignon on the floor.

Hopefully this helps illustrate the Conditionals in English Grammar.  If you get accustomed to the sentence formations, you will easily learn to use them in conversation.